“This home was designed by Travis Price, and like most houses built by architects with immediate name recognition, this place has stunning light, monumental spaces, and more asymmetry than a 13 year old suburban kid’s haircut.”

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You know how the first thing you do when you get home from work is to take off your pants and shoes and say a hearty “whew”?  (Come on, everyone does this, right?)  This gorgeous house, nestled in a woodsy cul de sac, is so private that you could take your pants and shoes off in the car and get your “whew”-ing done while walking up the driveway in underwear and bare feet.  That wins you that much more time to spend drinking straight from the Southern Comfort bottle while muttering, “where did it all go wrong?”  (I’m guessing it was when you majored in Theater.)

This home was designed by Travis Price, and like most houses built by architects with immediate name recognition, this place has stunning light, monumental spaces, and more asymmetry than a 13 year old suburban kid’s haircut.  You enter into the yawning, multi-tiered main space, which looks as much like an art gallery as a home.  There’s a ton of natural light;  there are so many windows and glass doors that if you opened them all at once, the house would probably collapse like an accordion.  The great room area is oriented around an imposing fireplace that looks tall enough to rappel down, and the formal dining room is large but very warm, like the heatstricken tourist who fainted on me in a crowded Metro car last week.

The kitchen is outfitted with top of the line stainless steel appliances;  there’s even a wine fridge, which has edged ahead of “indoor plumbing” and “a roof” on my list of necessary features in a house.  There are acres of counterspace, and a marble island that’s legitimately bigger than many entire kitchens.  A set of glass doors also open onto a private balcony that’s perfect for an after-dinner drink or, when your well-intentioned spouse goes to the bathroom, quickly flinging their terrible “green bean casserole” into the woods.

Up the dizzying stairs and landings is the master suite, which has many small windows set high up on the walls, another private balcony, and another massive fireplace that looks big enough to roast a wild pig on a spit in.  (“I’ll take ‘Inexplicable Things Airbnb Renters WILL Do In Your House’ for $1000, Alex.”)  The master bath is also huge, with twin basins, a built-in vanity, and a hot tub-slash-soaking tub.  And there’s yet another private balcony, so when you’re out of clean towels (i.e. always, if you’re a bachelor), you can just saunter out there and air dry.

There’s even an elevator, which is something I’d be very proud of having in my house.  I’d keep a picture of it in my wallet and show it around at holiday office parties.  The lower level of the house is a sprawling family room, with yet another oversized fireplace, and tons of space for entertaining;  it opens onto the massive flagstone patio, out back of the house, which looks out on Rock Creek Park.  Living right on Rock Creek Park is still one of the greatest privileges you can have in DC, even if marijuana legalization has made “growing a small pot patch in a remote park ravine, and blaming it on the kids down the street if the park rangers find it” much less necessary than it used to be.

2807 Chesterfield Place NW
5 Bedrooms, 5.5 Baths
$4,950,000

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All photos courtesy MRIS; listing courtesy TTR Sotheby’s, 202-333-1212

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