“And finally, the wraparound L-shaped terrace outside is perfect for parties, and since there are two separate sections, you could invite your work AND your regular friends, and keep them separated so neither group has to see how totally different (i.e. fake) you act with the other group.”

“And finally, the wraparound L-shaped terrace outside is perfect for parties, and since there are two separate sections, you could invite your work AND your regular friends, and keep them separated so neither group has to see how totally different (i.e. fake) you act with the other group.”

WE NEED FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S FIREPROOF HOUSE NOW MORE THAN EVER

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The most frightening implications of the Tennessee wildfire that erased an entire community from existence almost overnight is that, according to experts, these types of fires are going to become more and more common.  (This guy’s video of driving out through a hellish nightscape of burning cabins and collapsed trees is more heart-pounding than any Hollywood blockbuster.)  The short explanation: climate change is leading to longer droughts (producing tinder-like conditions) and more volatile weather patterns (the fire spread so far and fast due, in part, to winds that reached 90 miles per hour).

So how should Gatlinburg rebuild?  Incredibly, plans for a fireproof house, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright no less, have been around since 1907.

First published in Ladies Home Journal, Wright’s design is a variation on the classic American foursquare, but constructed entirely of concrete.  Wright described the house as a “masonry monolith … interlaced with steel fibers,” with interior walls made of plaster over metal or clay tile blocks.  The house was also strikingly cheap ($5000, albeit in 1907 dollars), due to its extremely simple four-up, four-down layout; since all four sides of the house were identical, construction only required one set of concrete forms. WE NEED FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT’S FIREPROOF HOUSE NOW MORE THAN EVER