CHARMING AND USEFUL CARDBOARD BUILDINGS: WIKKELHOUSE AND MORE

One wonderful innovation that is picking up steam and worldwide recognition is known as the Wikkelhouse.

Fiction Factory’s Wikkelhouse

It’s a compact but attractive and sturdy house that is made of cardboard, or to be more precise, virgin fiber paperboard sourced from Scandinavian trees. The company that creates them, Fiction Factory, believes in sustainable building practices and plants trees to offset their wood use. Wikkelhouses are straightforward, durable, charming, and versatile. CHARMING AND USEFUL CARDBOARD BUILDINGS: WIKKELHOUSE AND MORE

U Street \ˈyü\ \ˈstrēt\ The U Street Corridor is a commercial and residential district in Northwest Washington, D.C, U.S.A., with many shops, restaurants, nightclubs, art galleries, and music venues along a nine-block stretch of U Street.

U Street \ˈyü\ \ˈstrēt\ The U Street Corridor is a commercial and residential district in Northwest Washington, D.C, U.S.A., with many shops, restaurants, nightclubs, art galleries, and music venues along a nine-block stretch of U Street.

Capitol Hill \ˈka-pə-təl\ \ˈhil\ Capitol Hill, in addition to being a metonym for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C., stretching easterly in front of the United States Capitol along wide avenues.

Capitol Hill \ˈka-pə-təl\ \ˈhil\ Capitol Hill, in addition to being a metonym for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C., stretching easterly in front of the United States Capitol along wide avenues.

THE CREEPIEST NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE BUILDINGS IN AMERICA

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When the Intercept revealed, last week, that a windowless, heavily-fortified Manhattan skyscraper is one of the the NSA’s main eavesdropping stations in the country, people were shocked – though I can’t imagine why. If there was ever a building where form followed function, this was it. This sinister, monolithic, unlit, windowless fortress is a cartoon version of an NSA headquarters; was their architect an 11 year old? (Consider, however, that this “hiding in plain sight” strategy worked for several decades. Maybe these psy-ops types know what they’re doing.)

It turns out that the NSA Manhattan skyscraper isn’t the only glaringly obvious, creepy-looking spy HQ. I can’t decide if the design of these buildings was a brilliant stroke of reverse psychology, or if our intelligence agencies are just that brazen. (“Yeah we’re listening in on your phone calls, complain about it and we’ll release the emails you wrote to your college girlfriend about how you still think about the weekend you spent at that Swiss enema retreat.”)

THE CREEPIEST NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE BUILDINGS IN AMERICA