YOUR OWN PERSONAL MAGNUM PI

Wake up DC — because what the Washingtonian just coined the “Uber for private investigators” has just opened its doors for service to District residents all over.

A local private investigation startup that offers affordable by-the-hour pricing for individuals and “casual investigations” is making waves in the area for opening the doors to their eerily but fascinatingly majestic 8,000 square foot space.

Been wondering exactly where it is your girlfriend really goes every weekend when she claims she is spending time with her mother? YOUR OWN PERSONAL MAGNUM PI

YOU CAN BET THE FARM ON HAVING FUN AT THESE ATTRACTIONS

enchanted forest

What’s great about living in D.C. is that you’re only about 30 minutes away in almost any direction from rural delights such as the farms that once sat on the land that is now our nation’s capital. Each year, our unending hunger for bigger houses and more space greater encroaches upon this farmland, pushing the cornfields and haylofts farther afield. YOU CAN BET THE FARM ON HAVING FUN AT THESE ATTRACTIONS

RETIRED BUSES REBORN AS MOBILE FOOD MARKETS

Many communities are home to “food deserts,” or areas where grocery stores are inaccessible due to distance or cost. Food deserts can form because of deficits in public transit, high food prices, residents not owning vehicles or having limited mobility for various reasons, or other factors. Some areas, including Washington D.C., are lucky to have mobile food markets, which aim to alleviate this difficulty. Retired city and school buses have been turned into food and farmers’ markets in order to distribute fresh food to undeserved neighborhoods in many areas, including D.C., St. Louis and Toronto. RETIRED BUSES REBORN AS MOBILE FOOD MARKETS

THESE “SPITE HOUSES” ARE MONUMENTS TO THE DEPTHS OF HUMAN PETTINESS

Seattle-spite-house-2

Whoever came up with the economic law that people always make rational decisions clearly never saw a spite house.  (Someone actually won a Nobel for disproving that law.)  A spite house is a structure that’s built for the sole purpose of annoying someone, usually by blocking a view or access.  As a phenomenon, the spite house dates back to at least the early 18th century, when the youngest of three brothers in Massachusetts, angry about his share of the inheritance, built a tiny wedge-shaped house in front of the family mansion, just to ruin their view.  It didn’t get him into the will, but I bet it made him feel better.  Spite houses have been around for centuries and can be found in every part of the world, thus proving that if there’s a universal sentiment, it’s probably not love – it’s probably spite. THESE “SPITE HOUSES” ARE MONUMENTS TO THE DEPTHS OF HUMAN PETTINESS

ARCHITECTURE FOR GOOD: BATTLING HOMELESSNESS

When homelessness is a concern, the home-less aspect is often (and unfortunately) only the tip of the iceberg. Those who find themselves battling homelessness can often come from heavy, challenging backgrounds that expose them to things such as abuse, addiction, violence, and more. Finding both the mental strength and physical resources to bounce back from homelessness is no small feat – which is why having effective programs in place cannot be overlooked. ARCHITECTURE FOR GOOD: BATTLING HOMELESSNESS