FORGET BRICKS – INTRODUCING HOMES MADE BY 3D PRINTERS

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When you mention evolution some might think of apes, or whales with little limbs looking sad, drawn across the page of your old science book. Or you might think of the Internet and get sidetracked into the thought process of how in the heck you survived without Google or a handheld database of everything you could ever need (or want to know). I bet if we played a word association game, you’d have to get pretty far down the list before “evolution” led to a light bulb that correlated with the word “printer.” But, given a closer look, I think anyone would be hard-pressed to disagree –– printers have come a long way, baby. FORGET BRICKS – INTRODUCING HOMES MADE BY 3D PRINTERS

DC DEVELOPMENT(S): THE WREN

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As I’ve gotten older, the “checklist” I have for every apartment, home, or real estate hunt has shifted ever so slightly. Now, instead of my only criteria being that it fits within my budget and doesn’t look like the ceiling fan will decapitate me when I’m least expecting it, I get to be a little bit pickier. I can hold out for something with exposed brick or that’s walkable to a hip bar where I can spend way too much money or a place where there’s a doorman dedicated to receiving my amazon prime packages promptly (and without judgment). Looking to some of DC’s latest developments, I’d probably even be prompted to hold out for an apartment that sits comfortably atop a Whole Foods, so I can buy organic cheese puffs and whole trade chocolate that I can’t afford at a moment’s notice. I’m talking of course, about a development nearby Howard University at 965 Florida Ave. NW: The Wren. DC DEVELOPMENT(S): THE WREN

DC DEVELOPMENT(S): REIMAGINING THE EASTERN BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

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Like any major city, DC is always evolving. Buildings are being flipped, businesses being tweaked…the city is constantly moving in roughly a billion different directions. In all of the hubbub, it’s easy to forget that while it seems like the changes come at a million miles per hour, development takes time, and often a lot of it. One development that has been fighting for action for almost a decade now in Hill East is the old Eastern Branch Girls and Boys Club Building. DC DEVELOPMENT(S): REIMAGINING THE EASTERN BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

DC DEVELOPMENT(S): AFFORDABLE HOUSING ATOP THE METRO

It’s not hush-hush, in fact it’s pretty common knowledge: living in and around the District is pricey. Whether you’re on top of the world in terms of finances, or barely scraping by, the housing here is a hot commodity, and the truth is that we need more affordable housing.

Alexandria, Virginia – a little over 8-miles from the pocket of the metro DC area – was once an option for those who needed access to the city but wanted more affordable housing options. And yet, the times have changed. According to Curbed, less than 6 percent of Alexandria’s available housing qualifies as affordable. Not to mention:

“Furthermore, 9 percent of the city’s disappeared between 2000 and 2017. Before, the inventory was 18,218 units. Now, the inventory is 1,749 apartments.” DC DEVELOPMENT(S): AFFORDABLE HOUSING ATOP THE METRO

ARE PARKING SPACES KILLING AFFORDABLE HOUSING?

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When the DC Board of Zoning Adjustment finally approved the 123-unit micro-unit development in Blagden Alley this week, it brought over two years of lobbying and court battles to a close.  Neighborhood residents came out of it with a clear victory; the development, which had been originally approved with zero parking, was now going to include 21 below-ground spaces and a car elevator.  They got their parking spaces – but at what cost? ARE PARKING SPACES KILLING AFFORDABLE HOUSING?

MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR DC FAMILIES COMING SOON

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A rendering of proposed 100-unit affordable housing project on 50th street NE.

The Economic Policy Institute estimates that most DC families with children must spend at least $80,000 per year to have an “adequate but modest” life in the DC metro area, which makes it extremely difficult for households with less than $40,000 to make a living in The District. In the maps below, you will find that most of the DC neighborhoods east of the Anacostia river file as “low-income” on their taxes. MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR DC FAMILIES COMING SOON