HOG HOTELS AND DRONE HIVES: YOUR FUTURE NEIGHBORS ARE GOING TO BE VERY WEIRD

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You may think it can’t get any worse than the couple next door who passive-aggressively weed-whacks your front yard, without even asking, when it gets a sliver higher than an inch, or the recent GW grads who have all their salmon shorts-wearing bros over to their deck every single weekend to play beer pong and toss their red Solo cups into your backyard, but no, it can actually get a lot worse.  People aren’t just moving to cities;  entire industries are, too, and as they confront the problem of scarcer real estate, they’re embracing verticality.  Which means your next neighbor could be, say, a thirty-story drone hive. HOG HOTELS AND DRONE HIVES: YOUR FUTURE NEIGHBORS ARE GOING TO BE VERY WEIRD

COME CELEBRATE THE YEAR OF THE DOG

Although D.C.’s Chinatown is small and continues to shrink every year, no one can say our Chinese New Year celebration doesn’t rock.

Thousands don puffy coats and knit caps every year and flood into the Gallery Place/Chinatown Metro stop looking to secure prime parade viewing spots along 7th and 8th streets.

This year — 4716 — is the Year of the Dog. (Of course, here in America, every year is the year of the dog.) COME CELEBRATE THE YEAR OF THE DOG

DOCKLESS BIKESHARES PROVE YET AGAIN THAT WE CAN’T HAVE NICE THINGS

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Who would’ve thought the age-old argument over human nature would’ve been settled by something as mundane as dockless bikeshare bicycles? The theory was that if people are essentially good and well-meaning, then they’d treat the bikes with respect and return them to their proper place even though no one is watching. On the other hand, if people are essentially bad and corrupt, they’d trash the bikes and throw them in the canal just because they can. Guess what they’ve been doing. DOCKLESS BIKESHARES PROVE YET AGAIN THAT WE CAN’T HAVE NICE THINGS

CHINA’S FOREST CITY: BATTLING POLLUTION ONE PLANT AT A TIME

It’s no secret: China is an industrial powerhouse. They serve up consumer-oriented goods faster than we can serve up burger and fries State-side. But, those factories and that enviable material making has come at a price: heavy air pollution. Overseas, it’s not uncommon for school to be cancelled due to a day ruined by smog, masks are worn regularly, and there are mornings that look like night as the sun fights to peak through a heavy layer of pollution soot. In other words, conditions are not ideal…they’re concerning. The pollution problem is actually responsible for over a million deaths in China each year, with many urban areas being subject to conditions that rival those in the middle of forest fires. CHINA’S FOREST CITY: BATTLING POLLUTION ONE PLANT AT A TIME