DC DEVELOPMENT(S): REIMAGINING THE EASTERN BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

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Like any major city, DC is always evolving. Buildings are being flipped, businesses being tweaked…the city is constantly moving in roughly a billion different directions. In all of the hubbub, it’s easy to forget that while it seems like the changes come at a million miles per hour, development takes time, and often a lot of it. One development that has been fighting for action for almost a decade now in Hill East is the old Eastern Branch Girls and Boys Club Building. DC DEVELOPMENT(S): REIMAGINING THE EASTERN BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

BREAKING GROUND: 3 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN THE WORKS

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Within the real estate industry, especially in commercial real estate, many projects are discussed, proposed, and negotiated for months or even years. There is usually a lot of time that passes before the end consumer (yes, that is you reading this) actually sees a shovel or a crane cracking open the ground. While some of these projects are purely residential, some are government-owned, and others mixed-use. Regardless of their orientation, they all play a role in reshaping and evolving the cultural landscape of the nation’s capital. BREAKING GROUND: 3 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN THE WORKS

NEW ECKINGTON PROPOSAL: 328 UNIT MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT

imageAlthough it is often overlooked by neighborhoods such as NoMa, Brentwood, Edgewood and Bloomingdale, Eckington has become a more attractive and affordable alternative to work, live, and play. Newer developments, amenities and even dog parks have been woven into the long-term plan for this D.C. neighborhood. One design, in particular, rendered by Foulger-Pratt aims to deliver an 83 foot-tall pentagonal mixed-use building with 328 residential units and 8,380 square feet of ground-floor retail. This proposal is set for the 1.79-acre site at 1501 Harry Thomas Way NE. NEW ECKINGTON PROPOSAL: 328 UNIT MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT

“Upstairs, the master bedroom is quite large, and also looks onto the street, so you can lie in bed all day and note every single coming and going of all your neighbors. (This is what my dad does, now that he’s retired.) There’s a beautiful walk-in closet with tons of built-in storage, so go ahead and click on that “sock of the month club” ad that keeps popping up on Facebook, you know you want to.”

“Upstairs, the master bedroom is quite large, and also looks onto the street, so you can lie in bed all day and note every single coming and going of all your neighbors. (This is what my dad does, now that he’s retired.) There’s a beautiful walk-in closet with tons of built-in storage, so go ahead and click on that “sock of the month club” ad that keeps popping up on Facebook, you know you want to.”

“There are twin basins and a balcony, which is not something I’ve seen in a bathroom before; the temptation to go out there naked after a shower, to “air dry” yourself would be hard to resist. (I’m sure the temptation will lessen after the third or fourth time your neighbors call the police.)”

“There are twin basins and a balcony, which is not something I’ve seen in a bathroom before; the temptation to go out there naked after a shower, to “air dry” yourself would be hard to resist. (I’m sure the temptation will lessen after the third or fourth time your neighbors call the police.)”

DC NEIGHBORHOODS THAT SHOULD BE RENAMED ASAP (AND A FEW THAT SHOULDN’T)

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Demi Moore’s real name is Demetria Guynes.  I only mention it to prove that branding does actually matter, and why would neighborhoods be any exception?  Renaming neighborhoods isn’t a new thing in the District;  Columbia Heights was originally known as “Pleasant Plains” or “Cowtown.”  (The latter being arguably the worst neighborhood name I’ve ever heard, ever.)  And “NoMa” was only invented a few years ago, but we’ll get to that below. DC NEIGHBORHOODS THAT SHOULD BE RENAMED ASAP (AND A FEW THAT SHOULDN’T)