DC STARTUP SPOTLIGHT: TRANSITSCREEN

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Mass transit: It’s great to have, in a I-love-to-brag-to-my-friends-that-live-in-places-with-less-planned-infrastructure kinda way. But, also it’s the root of 105.3% of your recurring complaints re: living in a city. The truth about taking the DC metro is that it’s all fun and games until you actually need it. Then you’re left huffing and puffing, running for the Red Line only to find out that it’s actually not working and you’ll have to walk to your destination, starting by putting one foot in front of the another in the direction from which you came. Yes, the underground doesn’t come without its trials and tribulations. However, one DC startup is out to make train-bound commutes a little easier, with the gift of foresight. The company? TransitScreen. DC STARTUP SPOTLIGHT: TRANSITSCREEN

THE MOST ANXIETY-INDUCING ARCHITECTURE PHOTOS ON THE INTERNET

The apartment I live in now has a dropped ceiling, except for the parts where it doesn’t, and you can look up through random un-dropped ceiling portals and see the original metal ceiling, and from certain angles you can see sections where the original metal ceiling has been torn away to expose wiring and roof beams and various dark crevices that I’m absolutely certain are teeming with silverfish and roach nests.  Examining my trashed, and possibly hazardous-to-health, ceiling makes me feel incredibly anxious, and yet I do it like twice a day.  Looking at this kind of thing is like watching a horror movie;  the anxiety is terrible, but you can’t get enough.   Grab your Xanax and let’s look at some terrible, horrible, irresistible photos of precarious houses. THE MOST ANXIETY-INDUCING ARCHITECTURE PHOTOS ON THE INTERNET

THESE LEANING BUILDINGS ARE MOSTLY SAFE, BUT I WOULDN’T WANT TO LIVE IN ONE

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When people bought multi-million dollar condos in San Francisco’s Millennium Tower, they probably thought they’d bought into a foolproof investment. After all, the San Francisco housing market has skyrocketed since the beginning of the tech boom; a million dollar condo in San Francisco, bought ten years ago, is now worth several times that.  So they’re understandably furious that, just a few years later, their homes are now worth nothing. THESE LEANING BUILDINGS ARE MOSTLY SAFE, BUT I WOULDN’T WANT TO LIVE IN ONE