The lower level of the home is a big rec room with a wine fridge and a wet bar, so just resign yourself now to hosting every Super Bowl party for the next decade.  There’s also a sauna down here, so instead of hitting the gym and dieting (ugh) for 10 weeks the next time you have to be in a friend’s wedding, you can just wait until the week before and sweat off twenty pounds in here like a high school wrestler making weight.

The lower level of the home is a big rec room with a wine fridge and a wet bar, so just resign yourself now to hosting every Super Bowl party for the next decade.  There’s also a sauna down here, so instead of hitting the gym and dieting (ugh) for 10 weeks the next time you have to be in a friend’s wedding, you can just wait until the week before and sweat off twenty pounds in here like a high school wrestler making weight.

THE BEST RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE AROUND: AIA’S 2018 HOUSING AWARDS

Some people try to pretend like they’re not interested in real estate –– like  a home is simply about a roof over their heads, nothing more. But, put those same uninterested folks in the midst of a house well built, decorated, and maintained and you can see their energy shift. Their productivity shine. Their mood lifted. The fact is, the space you’re in matters –– and that’s why there are awards and recognitions galore for the spaces that inspire.  One of the most respected voices in the industry belongs to the American Institute of Architects (AIA), which gives prestigious awards out annually. Recently, the AIA noted their picks for 2018’s Housing Awards, acknowledging the most notable residential projects built in the last year. THE BEST RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE AROUND: AIA’S 2018 HOUSING AWARDS

“This amazing modernist home was designed by Winthrop Faulkner, a name that’ll raise eyebrows at a cocktail party even among people who have no idea who he is.  That name just sounds distinguished.  It’s the name of a man who wears linen suits and will tell you to your face that you’re not good enough to date his daughter.  This house he’s designed (originally for a labor organizer) is a passive solar home, which means that it gets electricity from the sun and that when you ask where it wants to eat, it’ll say “I don’t care,” but then complain about wherever you pick.”

“This amazing modernist home was designed by Winthrop Faulkner, a name that’ll raise eyebrows at a cocktail party even among people who have no idea who he is.  That name just sounds distinguished.  It’s the name of a man who wears linen suits and will tell you to your face that you’re not good enough to date his daughter.  This house he’s designed (originally for a labor organizer) is a passive solar home, which means that it gets electricity from the sun and that when you ask where it wants to eat, it’ll say “I don’t care,” but then complain about wherever you pick.”

DC ARCHITECTURE SPOTLIGHT: KUBE

Artists are spunky. No two are the same, and that’s the way it should be. Due to distinct personalities and interpretations of the world around them, artists often take on seemingly similar projects and come up with ending results that are, far and wide, on opposite ends of the spectrum. As a mode of art, architecture is the same way. Each architecture firm has their own style, their own portfolio – their own spin on the way four walls come together and put a roof over our heads. DC’s architects are no different, and that’s why this series is so fun. Today’s post will feature KUBE Architecture, a modern architecture studio based in the District. DC ARCHITECTURE SPOTLIGHT: KUBE

ARCHITECTURE TREND ON THE (HIGH) RISE: TIMBER TOWERS

Say this three times fast:

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck was collecting wood for a skyscraper?

Then go ahead and say this:

What?!

When thinking of a typical skyscraper, most think of steel beams, concrete, and reflective metals soaring closer to the sun and holding the dreams of many as they hustle through their 9-5. One architect, however, is challenging the status-quo (as artists do), and urging the business world to think outside of their well-known, ironclad box. ARCHITECTURE TREND ON THE (HIGH) RISE: TIMBER TOWERS

BIRDHOUSE ARCHITECTURE: ART BY DOUGLAS BARNHARD

BH1

If I’m being honest, I would admit to you that I’m a firm believer that birdhouses are having a major real estate crisis. I find that there are less and less folks willing to give up their picture-perfect tree limbs to house a monstrosity that is more or less a wonky, anti-chic decoration that’s meant to attract the very creatures that some have nightmares about (and yeah, by “some,” I mean me). Birds have been a source of discomfort for me ever since I a first popped open a bag of Lays at the beach and found that every seagull that has ever lived also shares my lust for salt (or any food, really) –– and they aren’t the least bit bashful about it. BIRDHOUSE ARCHITECTURE: ART BY DOUGLAS BARNHARD

“Further on is a family room, for all your familyin’, and a media room, which is a nice way of saying, “this is where you’re going to spend most of your weekends, curled up under a filthy fleece blanket and watching pirated episodes of ‘Golden Girls.'”  The media room opens onto a nice little balcony, so you can go out there and have a cigarette and decompress after that super-intense episode where Blanche’s ex husband visits and almost tears the girl-clique apart.”

“Further on is a family room, for all your familyin’, and a media room, which is a nice way of saying, “this is where you’re going to spend most of your weekends, curled up under a filthy fleece blanket and watching pirated episodes of ‘Golden Girls.’”  The media room opens onto a nice little balcony, so you can go out there and have a cigarette and decompress after that super-intense episode where Blanche’s ex husband visits and almost tears the girl-clique apart.”