DC DEVELOPMENT(S): THE PARKS AT WALTER REED

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Keeping tabs on a city like DC can seem daunting ­–– there are so many moving parts to keep track of and so much that’s changing on a regular basis. And while your commute home might be filled with more “When did that open?” and “Has that always been there?” moments than you’d like to admit, one thing’s for sure: It’s easy to stay interested in this humble abode we like to call home. One of the most exciting and buzzed about developments on DC’s calendar as of lately is The Parks at Walter Reed. DC DEVELOPMENT(S): THE PARKS AT WALTER REED

DC MAKES THE CUT AS ONE OF THE 10 BEST AMERICAN CITIES FOR URBAN PARKS

People dancing, people laughing

A man selling ice cream…

Hopefully those two simple lines have sent you into a head-bobbing, joyful rendition of “Saturday in the Park,” a classic ode as to how amazing green escapes can be among city streets. If you’ve ever lived close to a park, you might be one of those people who swears by the ideal of “location, location, location.” Parks are where dogs (and people alike) can run around to get out some of their boundless energy. They’re where kites grace the skies and flowers bloom from the ground. They’re where you can go pretending you’re planning to run, only to decide last minute that you’re cool“just walking for today.” They’re certainly the sight of some ice-cream treats. And last, but certainly not least, they are a breath of fresh air and a place of respite from the day to day rumble that pushes us all along in the city. DC MAKES THE CUT AS ONE OF THE 10 BEST AMERICAN CITIES FOR URBAN PARKS

WHEN THE DISTRICT QUASI-LEGALLY SEIZED & DEMOLISHED AN ENTIRE QUADRANT OF THE CITY, BECAUSE…REASONS?

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Max Morris owned Frank’s Department Store at 712 Fourth Street SW, as well as the hardware store next door.  It was a few years after World War II; the economy was humming along, and the neighborhood was bustling.  So Morris was understandably puzzled when the government decided to use the then-untested law of “eminent domain” to take both of his properties, tear them down, and give them to a private developer for “redevelopment.”  Morris sued, lost, and appealed to the Supreme Court.  (When Morris died, his stepson, Samuel Berman, took up the case.)  Eventually, the Supreme Court upheld the city’s right to seize the two stores, a decision that, in just a few years, led to 99% of the buildings in Southwest being razed to the ground. WHEN THE DISTRICT QUASI-LEGALLY SEIZED & DEMOLISHED AN ENTIRE QUADRANT OF THE CITY, BECAUSE…REASONS?

DC DEVELOPMENT(S): THE PERLA

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If you hear church bells ringing, it might be no more than an echo. Okay, that might be a tad dramatic –– there are plenty of places of worship untouched by DC’s growing pains. Still though, it’s only right to acknowledge that as development creeps up in unsuspecting corners, some of DC’s establishments get pushed out. That is the case as The Perla, one of DC’s developments in the works, comes to fruition in the heart of Shaw. DC DEVELOPMENT(S): THE PERLA

DC DEVELOPMENT(S): MIDTOWN CENTER

We’re getting to the point in winter where, every once in a while, out of the blue, will come a sunny day that almost coerces you into believing that the worst is over; Spring has sprung. And while we’re not there yet (curse that little groundhog), there’s still enough construction happening around the District to give us all hope that it won’t be all February-ish forever. And, for now, I’ll take that (though I must admit I prefer chirping birds to jackhammers). While there are many projects that are trudging full-force through winter, there are definitely some especially monstrous ones making strides in the midst of the coldest months. One of those projects is Midtown Center. DC DEVELOPMENT(S): MIDTOWN CENTER

DC ARCHITECTURE SPOTLIGHT: CORE

If you haven’t already been following along, you might not know that in recent months, I’ve been exploring the who’s who and what’s what of architecture in DC. I mean, we all know DC is home to some interesting architecture – both modern-day, historical, and just about every era and style in between. But who is behind the city’s walls? The city’s streets? Who has planned them, brick by brick and stone by stone? The answers I have been looking for, of course, are long-winded and multi-dimensional. But, today, I will shine the spotlight on at least one piece of the puzzle: CORE Architecture Group. DC ARCHITECTURE SPOTLIGHT: CORE